Rare footage shot during research

Filmmaker John Wallace getting some underwater shots of the sparling.
Filmmaker John Wallace getting some underwater shots of the sparling.

A documentary filmmaker has captured rarely seen footage of the annual sparling mass spawning event in the Cree as part of a Saving the Sparling project.

Galloway Fisheries Trust has been collecting scientific data on the elusive Cree sparling and showing the fish to school children as well as creating a short documentary about the arrival of the sparling to their spawning ground.

As part of the project, the trust is holding drop-in days to collect local knowledge of sparling to ensure the history of the fish in this area is not lost.

Short clips migration to the spawning grounds and an exhibition about the sparling will be shown at both events.

The fish spawns every spring in the Cree, but lives its life in estuary water. It is small and silver, with a greenish appearance in the water and can be distinguished from other fish by the cucumber-like odour it gives off when out of the water.

The drop-ins will be held on June 13 in the Belted Galloway, Newton Stewart, and at the Mill on the Fleet, Gatehouse of Fleet, on June 20. Both venues will be open between 2-6pm when free refreshments will be served.