Tales of hope, despair and horseshoes

Private Charles Love
Private Charles Love

The Galloway Gazette, July 15th, 1916

LETTER OF HOPE, LETTER OF DESPAIR

A letter arrived for Mrs Marshall, 16 Princes Street, with the news that her husband, Sergeant Alex Marshall KOSB, had been wounded at the front and was to be sent home to a hospital in England. But two days later another letter arrived for her, this time from a chaplain, with the devastating news that he had since died and had been buried in France; leaving her a widow with two children.

ONE OF THREE BROTHERS WOUNDED

News came through to Mrs Love, Hillhead, Port William, that her son Private Charles Love of the 1st KOSB, had been wounded in action. Private Love enlisted at the outbreak of the war, and was previously wounded during the Dardanelles campaighn.

A brother, Private William Love had also been on active service with the KOSB, while another brother, Private George Love, is in training with the 5th KOSB. George made the journey on foot from Port William to Dumfries in order to enlist.

BLACKSMITH WORKS THROUGH THE NIGHT

Mr Robert Rankin, Blacksmith, Market Street, Stranraer, during the month of June 1916, was ordered by the War Office to make at his smithy no less than 1200 horseshoes. The work was completed at the smithy by working both day and night and all the shoes passed Government inspection.