Another lifesaving year for RNLI

Kirkcudbright lifeboat on exercise with helmsman Martin Valentine.
Kirkcudbright lifeboat on exercise with helmsman Martin Valentine.

RNLI lifeboats in Scotland were launched 1078 times last year, rescuing 1046 people of which 29 were lives saved.

RNLI lifeboat crews in Girvan and Aberdeen and RNLI flood rescue teams assisted other emergency services and the public during recent storms and flooding in Scotland.

Kirkcudbright lifeboat on exercise with helmsman Martin Valentine.

Kirkcudbright lifeboat on exercise with helmsman Martin Valentine.

RNLI lifeguards stationed at five beaches in Scotland between them dealt with 116 incidents.

The busiest lifeboat station in Scotland this year was Broughty Ferry where the crew went to sea 92 times. Queensferry was Scotland’s busiest inshore lifeboat with a total of 73 launches and 150 people rescued.

On the west coast Troon lifeboat launched 74 times and rescued 31 people and the crew of the Mallaig lifeboat were kept busy with 44 launches and a total of 53 people rescued.

Last year the RNLI worked in communities on land as well as serving them at sea.

In December the Girvan lifeboat crew worked with other emergency services to help members of the public escape a bus which had been caught in flood water.

During the first week of the New Year in Aberdeen the lifeboat crew used rocket propelled lines to help SSE restore power after storms and flooding.

Matt Crofts, RNLI Operations, said: We would like to thank all of our volunteers for their tireless hard work and dedication over the last 12 months, without all of our volunteers, fundraisers and education teams our lifesaving service would not operate.’

Lifeboats in Scotland:

1,078 launches - 17 in winds above force 7 and 449 in darkness. 1,046 people rescued/ 29 lives saved / 70 young people under 18 rescued/ 976 people over 18 rescued /30 launches where first aid was required / 193 launches to boats with machinery failure 340 launches to pleasure craft / 39 launches were to people cut off by the tide.