Hospital tree planting marks service success

At the tree planting in Stranraer ' Peter Toon of Vision Logistics; Wigtownshire Health Officer Stevie Beggs; Martin Wykes of Vision Logistics; gardener Davie Marshall; Nick Woodforth of SCA; Chairman of NHS Community Gardens John McNaught; and Wigtownshire Health Officer Jenny Macdonald.
At the tree planting in Stranraer ' Peter Toon of Vision Logistics; Wigtownshire Health Officer Stevie Beggs; Martin Wykes of Vision Logistics; gardener Davie Marshall; Nick Woodforth of SCA; Chairman of NHS Community Gardens John McNaught; and Wigtownshire Health Officer Jenny Macdonald.

Planting schemes have been carried out in the grounds of local hospitals to mark the environmental benefits of a redesigned pattern of home deliveries for patients in Dumfries and Galloway.

Six trees have been planted at the Galloway Community Hospital in Stranraer, with two more at Newton Stewart Hospital. While at Nithbank Hospital in Dumfries, planters have been installed with a range of shrubs for patients and visitors to enjoy.

The trees and planters have been donated by the leading hygiene company SCA, the manufacturer of TENA incontinence products, who developed the redesigned home delivery service of its products in collaboration with NHS Dumfries and Galloway.

The first trials of the new delivery system were launched in the autumn of 2014 and between then and April 2015 almost two tonnes of carbon dioxide have been saved from going into the atmosphere.

“Our aim was to design a delivery system which could reduce the environmental impact of delivering our incontinence products, while at the same time not affect the quality of service from the perspective of the patient,” explained Nick Woodforth, SCA logistics and supply chain manager.

“Providing the trees for the hospitals is an appropriate way for SCA to say thank-you for the support of the Health Board in piloting the scheme.”

Following the success of the scheme in Dumfries and Galloway, it is hoped that it can now be replicated in other NHS regions around the UK.

Justine Anderson, General Manager, Health and Social Care Integration said: “We were very pleased to be involved with this environmentally friendly scheme, whilst still providing a high quality delivery service to the patients within our community.”

The trees planted in the grounds of Galloway Community Hospital are all indigenous to Scotland and include copper beech, silver birch and downy beech. Red and white currant trees have been planted at Newton Stewart as being ideal for attracting birds and wildlife.